Agecroft Hall and Gardens (Richmond)

Did you know there is a 16th century English Tudor mansion in Richmond, Virginia even though the English colony of Jamestown wasn’t founded until the 17th century? Agecroft Hall and Gardens in Richmond’s West End is a beautiful example of preserving and protecting history and makes a fun outing for families to learn more about Tudor history. Plan your visit today!

Patrick Henry’s Scotchtown (Virginia)

You know Patrick Henry’s famous “Give me liberty or give me death!" speech, made at Richmond’s Historic St. John’s Church in 1775. You may not know, however, that the home where he lived while crafting that historic speech is open for visitors and is celebrating its 300th year! Nestled in the rolling hills of western Hanover County, just 30 minutes north of Richmond, his home, called Scotchtown, is an atmospheric place to visit, especially during the month of October. Read my new review today and plan an autumn visit with your family!

Sherwood Forest (Virginia)

After writing about the Virginia Capital Trail last week, I’ll be reviewing many of the stops along the trail in the coming months. Several battlefields and historic homes are along the route, including the home of our nation’s 10th President, John Tyler. In my quest to visit all of the Presidential and First Lady historic sites, I knew I had to see it in conjunction with the Capital Trail. His home, named Sherwood Forest, is a peaceful place for your family to take a break while on a bike trip. Read my new review today!

Virginia Capital Trail

In Virginia, history is literally around every corner. The James River, which flows from the Chesapeake Bay to western Virginia, is the “road” along which Virginia’s history, and thereby America’s history, was founded. Beginning with Jamestown in 1607, this river and the land surrounding it has been the site of many significant historical events, including Native American villages, Colonial towns, and battles from 3 wars. A unique and socially-distanced way to view this historical area with your family is to bike or walk along the Virginia Capital Trail. It is the perfect place to have a family-friendly outing, especially during the cooler fall months. Read my new review today! Don't forget to sign up for my new newsletter - follow the "newsletter" link on my website!

Henricus Historical Park (Richmond)

Henricus Historical Park near Richmond is the site of one of the oldest settlements in America.  The site was founded in 1611 by English colonists as the second settlement in Virginia (the first was Jamestown).  Today the site is a living history museum with recreated English and Native American structures.  It has reopened after being closed for the coronavirus pandemic, and since it is mostly outside, it is a great place to visit with your family. Read my new review today!

Tuckahoe Plantation (Richmond)

My quest to visit Presidential and First Lady sites has been hampered by the travel restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic.  However, since I live in Central Virginia, an easy drive from many of these sites, I decided to check out a Presidential site in my own backyard, Tuckahoe Plantation.  It's a lovely site to visit, even during this pandemic. Read my new review today!

Last week of the Civil War (Virginia)

Living in Central Virginia, Civil War history is all around us.  With much of the war taking place in the area, there are many battlefields, historic homes, and museums with their own history from the war.  This week marks the 155th anniversary of the end of the war - from the fall of Richmond on April 3rd to the last battle at Sailor’s Creek on April 6th to Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox on April 9th.  Check out my new post about that week’s events and some spots to visit, both virtually and in person, to learn more about this important time period in our nation’s history.

Library of Virginia (Richmond)

Virginia is the birthplace of our nation, and its state library, the Library of Virginia, was created in 1823 as a repository for all of its original documents and manuscripts, dating back to Jamestown’s founding in 1607. Its online resources are vast, and with the current health crisis keeping our kids from attending school, this is the perfect time to explore the documents, artifacts, and manuscripts available. There is even a way for your kids to potentially get their volunteer hours through the Library’s Making History: Transcribe program. Read my new review today about visiting the Library, both in person and virtually!

Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia (Richmond)

One of the best places to learn more about African American history in the Richmond area is the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia.  This museum, located in the beautiful and historic Leigh Street Armory, is a thoughtful and educational place to learn more about the African American experience in Virginia and is an important place to visit while you are in Richmond.  I love its mission “to preserve stories that inspire!” Read my new review today and learn why you need to visit before April 18th!